COACH’S CORNER

Certifications

Pleasanton Youth Soccer League is pleased to sponsor the following CYSA License Certification Courses:

“F” Certification – A 9-hour course – Friday evening and all day Saturday, providing practice session/basic techniques.
“E” Certification – An 18 hour course – Friday evening and all day Saturday and Sunday that provides basic tactics and intermediate techniques. Coaches must hold an F certification to participate in this course.

Coaching Schools/Associations/Resources:

I. CYSA (California Youth Soccer Association)

CYSA Coaching Program:  Includes Guidelines for Coaching, Player and Team Development, and Modified Laws of the Game.

http://www.cysanorth.org/images/pdfs/coaching/cysacoachingprogram.pdf

Pleasanton Youth Soccer League is pleased to sponsor the following CYSA License  Courses:

1) Pre-F License - A 3-hour course, Taught only on Monday-Thursdays

Pre-F Course Manual:
http://www.cysanorth.org/images/pdfs/coaching/cysa%20pre-f%20manual.pdf

2) F License - A 9-hour course – Friday evening and all day Saturday, providing practice session/basic techniques.

Objective: Prelude to the “E” Course.
Course Length: Nine Hours total.
a) Three Hours Classroom:
- “The Routine”
- Methods of Coaching and Teaching
- Players and Their Game Responsibilities
b) Six Hours Field
- “The Routine” in action
- Role of the First Attacker
- Role of the First Defender

3) E License - An 18 hour course – Friday evening and all day Saturday and Sunday that provides basic tactics and intermediate techniques.
Coaches must hold an F License to participate in this course.

Objective: Prelude to the “E/D” Course.
Course Length: Eighteen Hours total.
a) Six Hours Classroom:
- Systems of Play
- Principles of Attack
- Principles of Defense
b) Twelve Hours Field
- Roles of the First and Second Attacker
- Roles of the First and Second Defender
- Tactics and the Laws of the Game

You can check out Dates and Times for local CYSA Courses offered by visiting their website:

http://www.cysanorth.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=148&Itemid=209

II. NSCAA (National Soccer Coaches Association of America)

Introductory Courses Recommended to take:

1) Youth Level I – Parent Coach

Formerly known as the Parent Coach Diploma, the Youth Level I Diploma is a 2 ½-hour course for coaches of players 5-8 years of age. The course deals with coaching young players who are playing the game for the first time. The course content includes philosophy of coaching youth, risk management strategies, organization of practice sessions and activities appropriate to players of this age.  There is no testing in the Youth Level I Diploma.  All candidates must be at least
14 years of age at the time of application. Candidates under 18 years of age must be accompanied by an adult for the duration of the course.

2) Youth Level II – State

Formerly known as the State Diploma, the Youth Level II Diploma is a five-hour course directed toward the person newly involved in coaching soccer. It is designed to help coaches working with players in the 5- to 10-year age range. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the physiological and psychological differences of coaching children. The course is designed to emphasize that the game itself essentially is the teacher and the focus of the coach at this level clearly is as facilitator. The curriculum focuses on the organization of a practice session, using small-sided games to enhance knowledge and fun, basic understanding of the Laws of the Game and information about the care and prevention of injuries. There is no testing in the Youth Level II Diploma. All candidates must be at least 14 years of age at the time of application.  Candidates under 18 years of age must be accompanied by an adult for the duration of the course.

3) Youth Level III – Youth

Formerly known as the Youth Diploma, the Youth Level III Diploma is designed for the youth coach working with players in age groups U-6 through U-8.  The overall objective of the course is to help coaches create the optimal learning environment for players at this developmental stage.  Emphasis is placed on the basic methods of coaching youth and understanding the physiological and psychological differences between coaching young children and coaching adolescents or adults. The course teaches coaches how to utilize the game of soccer itself as the teacher and encourages the coach to fulfill the role of facilitator of players’ growth and development. The curriculum also focuses on the organization of a practice session, teaching proper technique through activities and games appropriate for U-6 and
U-8 players, working with parents, helping players develop ball mastery, dribbling and striking the ball skills, and using small-sided games as teaching exercises and vehicles for player development.

The Youth Level III Diploma is a 13-hour course held over two days, featuring both classroom presentations (theory) and on-field instruction (praxis).  The course utilizes demonstrators in the targeted age groups for most field sessions. There is no testing involved in this course, through coaches are afforded an opportunity to be assessed on a practical demonstration and receive feedback from a staff coach.  Each person completing the course is awarded the Youth Level III Diploma.

You can check out Dates and Times for local NSCAA Courses offered by visiting their website:

http://www.nscaa.com/nrc.php

III. USSF (United States Soccer Federation)

1) USSF Coaching Education Website -
http://www.ussoccer.com/Coaches/Coaching-Education-Home.aspx

2) USSF Online Interactive Training – Passing, Shooting, Defending, Receiving & Control, Heading, and Dribbling

http://interactivetraining.easports.com/soccer/home.action

Forms
Coming Soon!
Coaches Handbook
Rules

Division 4 Rules and Guidelines:

Laws of the Game

Rec Coaches

Coach’s Code of Conduct

Be mindful never to shame a player, but to correct her in an uplifting way. Affirmation!

Believe in every player .Remember,”In youth is where miracles are made.”

Protect our players .Be big enough to build up, not tear down .Our kids are getting attacked from many places that we don’t often see and of which we are not aware.

Remember our job is to put our players in a position where they can develop to their fullest potential through proper teaching and nurturing.

Each player is part of our family, deserves every chance to succeed, and deserve the utmost respect.

Our players are student – athletes and we are teacher –coaches.

We hold ourselves accountable as teachers of young women and the lessons they need in order to navigate femininity and life.

Remember that parents are our partners. We strive to work with each family in helping their daughters to succeed.” Every girl is a daughter to her mother and father.

Love your players.

No profanity!

Know the difference between shaming and   coaching. No screaming, shaming, swearing, or sarcasm.

Don’t be afraid to apologize! We all make mistake .When mistake are made publicly, apologize publicly; when mistakes are made personally, apologize personally.

We are nurturing successful people, not just successful athletes.

Treat all opposing coaches and their teams with the honor true competitors deserve.

Respect all referees. They are imperfect and trying their best just as we are.

Regardless of our wins and losses, we will be successful if we carry out the above items.

Because I am a role model who has the power ,position and platform to make positive difference in the lives of my players, I commit to this code of conduct .When failing to live up to our standards I will allow for accountability and take responsibility for my actions.

Training Resources
Introduction to Coaching Education

The presentation of the U.S. Soccer coaching curriculum is another major step in the implementation of the framework developed by the Player Development Task Force, which was created in 2006 to review all aspects of player development in the United States and recommend a course of action.

The curriculum is designed to improve development of players in the organized player base in the United States, concentrating on creating more organized, age-appropriate training sessions, developing coaching practices and creating an environment that is fun for the players.

The curriculum builds on the successful launch and growth of the U.S. Soccer Development Academy. Initiated in the fall of 2007 after a detailed review of player development systems in the U.S. and across the world, the Development Academy has improved the training environment; provided relevant, high-level matches on a consistent basis; increased the level and efficiency of scouting for the national teams and provided players, coaches and referees with more structured programming.

GOALS

U.S. Soccer’s technical staff discusses the unveiling of the new coaching curriculum. The curriculum is designed to improve development of players in the organized player base in the United States, concentrating on creating more organized, age-appropriate training sessions, developing coaching practices and creating an environment that is fun for the players.

TRAINING

At the U.S. Soccer + SPARQ Player Development Summit, former U.S. Men’s National Team forward Brian McBride discussed the value of functional training in relation to player development. The three-time FIFA World Cup veteran and first American to score in multiple World Cups also conducted a field session with the U-18 Men’s National Team. 

IMPLEMENT

U.S. Soccer coaches and technical staff talk about the implementation of the new coaching curriculum, addressing how coaches around the country can use the document to plan effective training sessions for their team over the course of a season or year.

IMPACT

The impact of the new coaching curriculum goes beyond the U.S. Soccer + SPARQ Player Development Summit. U.S. Soccer technical staff discuss how the curriculum will influence coaches at all levels around the United States.

NEXT

At the conclusion of the U.S. Soccer + SPARQ Player Development Summit, U.S. Soccer technical staff addressed the next step for coaches around the country.

Downloads

Downloads (Note large file sizes)

Links

U.S. Soccer Federation:

Article that discusses U.S. Soccer Federation Position statements and Best Practices for Player Development. They provide recommendations that will help shape the future direction of youth soccer in the United States.

Click Here for the Article.